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Prairie Catholic Crest

Holy Family Parish

W
elcome to the Holy Family Parish, a faith-filled community located in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. We are a Parish of the Roman Catholic Diocese of LaCrosse. We extend a warm welcome to all who attend our church.

The Holy Family Parish of Prairie du Chien has two Churches; St. Gabriel's Church and St. John's Church both located in Prairie du Chien, WI.  Holy Family Parish also supports its Catholic elementary and middle school. We hope that you will find our parish and school community a place where your life of faith will be nourished.  We also hope that you will share your special talents within the community.

Your prayers, your presence and your talents are most welcome.

Our Mission:
The Holy Family Parish is a loving community united by our faith in Jesus Christ. Our prayerful liturgies are community celebrations shaped by tradition of over one hundred years of Eucharistic worship. We welcome all who seek God's love.
The Holy Family Parishes will support this mission by striving to worship God with devotion and celebration while fostering spiritual growth. We commit ourselves to nurturing the parish family while providing a challenging and high-quality Catholic educational program. We will achieve this through stewardship, acts of service, and utilizing our talents to their greatest potential.




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The following is from: www.http://catholicism.about.com

Holy Week is the week preceding Easter and the final week of Lent. Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday and ends with Holy Saturday, the day before Easter Sunday. Holy Week includes Holy Thursday (also known as Maundy Thursday) and Good Friday, which, together with Holy Saturday, are known as the Triduum. Before the revision of the liturgical calendar in 1969, Holy Week was the second week of Passiontide; in the current calendar, Passiontide is synonymous with Holy Week.

During Holy Week, Christians commemorate the Passion of Christ, Who died on Good Friday in reparation for the sins of mankind, and rose on Easter Sunday to give new life to all who believe. Thus, while Holy Week is solemn and sorrowful, it also anticipates the joy of Easter through the recognition of God's goodness in sending His Son to die for our salvation. Special observances this week are Palm Sunday, Spy Wednesday, Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday.

Palm Sunday commemorates the triumphal entrance of Christ into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:19), when palm branches were placed in His path, before His arrest on Holy Thursday and His Crucifixion on Good Friday. It thus marks the beginning of Holy Week, the final week of Lent, and the week in which Christians celebrate the mystery of their salvation through Christ's Death and His Resurrection on Easter Sunday.

Spy Wednesday; this is a reference to Judas's action in Matthew 26: 1416: ‘Then went one of the twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, to the chief priests, and said to them: What will you give me, and I will deliver him unto you? But they appointed him thirty pieces of silver. And from thenceforth he sought opportunity to betray him.’ The beginning of Matthew 26 seems to place that event two days before Good Friday. Thus, a spy entered the midst of the disciples on Wednesday of Holy Week, when Judas resolved to betray our Lord for 30 pieces of silver.

Holy Thursday is the day on which Christ celebrated the Last Supper with His disciples, four days after His triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday. Only hours after the Last Supper, Judas would betray Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane, setting the stage for Christ's Crucifixion on Good Friday. Holy Thursday is more than just the leadin to Good Friday; it is, in fact, the oldest of the celebrations of Holy Week. And with good reason: Holy Thursday is the day on which Catholics commemorate the institution of three pillars of the Catholic Faith: the Sacrament of Holy Communion, the priesthood, and the Mass. During the Last Supper, Christ blessed the bread and wine with the very words that Catholic and Orthodox priests use today to consecrate the Body and Blood of Christ during the Mass and the Divine Liturgy. In telling His disciples to "Do this in remembrance of Me," He instituted the Mass and made them the first priests.

Good Friday, the Friday before Easter Sunday, commemorates the Passion and Death of our Lord Jesus Christ on the Cross. Good Friday is the second of the three days of the Easter Triduum. From the earliest days of Christianity, no Mass has been celebrated on Good Friday; instead, the Church celebrates a special liturgy in which the account of the Passion according to the Gospel of John is read, a series of intercessory prayers (prayers for special intentions) are offered, and the faithful venerate the Cross by coming forward and kissing it.

The Good Friday liturgy concludes with the distribution of Holy Communion. Good Friday is a day of strict fasting and abstinence. Catholics over the age of 18 and under the age of 60 are required to fast, which means that they can eat only one complete meal and two smaller ones during the day, with no food in between. Catholics who are over the age of 14 are required to refrain from eating any meat, or any food made with meat, on Good Friday.

Holy Saturday is the final day of Lent, of Holy Week, and of the Easter Triduum, the three days (Holy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday) immediately preceding Easter, during which Christians commemorate the Passion and Death of Jesus Christ and prepare for His Resurrection.
As on Good Friday, there is no Mass offered for Holy Saturday. The Easter Vigil Mass, which takes place after sundown on Holy Saturday, properly belongs to Easter Sunday, since liturgically each day begins at sundown on the previous day. (That is why Saturday vigil Masses can fulfill our Sunday Duty.) Unlike on Good Friday, when Holy Communion is distributed at the afternoon liturgy commemorating Christ's Passion, on Holy Saturday the Eucharist is only given to the faithful as viaticum—that is, only to those in danger of death, to prepare their souls.

Until the revision of the rules for fasting and abstinence in 1969 strict fasting and abstinence continued to be practiced on the morning of Holy Saturday, thus reminding the faithful of the sorrowful nature of the day and preparing them for the joy of Easter feast. While fasting and abstinence are no longer required on Holy Saturday morning, practicing these Lenten disciplines is still a good way to observe this sacred day.





Wisconsin

Don't Forget your Private School Deduction!

Remember that Wisconsin (not federal) has a new deduction you can take on your 2014 Wisconsin Income Tax return. You can now deduct your private school dependent student's tuition. This deduction is up to $4000 per student for private school students grades K - 8.

This deduction goes on page 1 line 11 and is coded as 22 on your 2014 WI 1 form. You will need to fill out Wisconsin's Schedule PS to claim it. Click Here for link to Sched PS

You will also need our School's FEIN number. Please call our school office at 608-326-8624 and we will give you that number.




Holy Family Construction Updates:

Holy Family has started "Building the Future". Click on the picture below to see the progress on our Fellowship Hall.

Fellowship Hall:











Building the Future... Preserving the Past





FROM THE PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE

Thank you for your interest in Prairie Catholic Schools.  St. Gabriel’s campus is our elementary school, and encompasses grades Pre-K though 4th, and St. John’s campus is our middle school which entails grades 5th through 8th.  Additionally, on-site daycare is available at the St. Gabriel’s campus.
 
We know that choosing the right education for your child is one of the most important decisions you face. The entire staff at Prairie Catholic appreciates the fact that you are willing to consider our school, and wish you to know that this is greatly appreciated. The education of our youth is an honor and a great responsibility that we do not take lightly.

A Catholic school offers a unique environment with very special opportunities for its students to grow spiritually. Prairie Catholic is no different. Our setting allows educators to share their faith and values while educating their students, your children. We are committed to helping children grow in faith and love and to display respect and fellowship. Prairie Catholic does not discriminate based on faith and includes many non-Catholic families. These families appreciate our caring, student-centered environment that teaches children to follow Christ’s command to love one another and treat others with respect.

Prairie Catholic provides a strong academic curriculum and a safe learning environment for students to reach their greatest potential.  We support each child by recognizing his or her own talents and instilling an appreciation for the gifts of others. This atmosphere fosters a mutual respect for one another.

We encourage, and are committed to, a cooperative partnership between family and school.  We seek to work with you as parents, in helping your child become the best they can be.  We believe in the mutual relationship of school supporting family and family supporting school.

At Prairie Catholic, we are positive people – learning, loving and living our faith.  We aspire to create a place where your child is safe, happy and knows they are special.

We would love to discuss further the opportunities we can offer your child.  Please call us for a personal tour at:

(608) 326-8624  (St. Gabriel’s)
(608) 326-4400  (St. John’s)

Sincerely,

Wade Marlow

Principal, Prairie Catholic Schools


Volunteer Sign up Sheet:

Please consider being a parish volunteer. Click Here to bring up a form you can fill in right from your computer and then print out. Send in to either rectory, drop off, or put in colection basket on Sunday. Thank you for your consideration.


 

     
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